The International Journal of Population Data Science (IJPDS) is an electronic, open-access, peer-reviewed journal focussing on the science pertaining to population data.

It publishes articles on all aspects of research, development and evaluation connected with data about people and populations. These include:

  • Accessing distributed data
  • Analytical advances
  • Architectures and infrastructures
  • Capacity building
  • Delivering and measuring impact
  • Data and linkage quality
  • Epidemiology
  • Ethical, legal and societal implications (ELSI)
  • Legal and regulatory issues
  • Linking to emerging/complex data types
  • Outcomes-based research
  • Privacy-protection methodologies
  • Public involvement and engagement
  • Service evaluations
  • Technological advances in data storage and management
  • Using big data

The creation of the IJPDS was inspired by the International Population Data Linkage Network (IPDLN). The journal has a regular section for topics of particular interest to the IPDLN sub-edited by the Director(s) of the network.



If your research is funded by UKRI (RCUK)* then you can apply for help with Article Processing Charges (APCs)?

The UKRI (RCUK) block grant is now available to its funded researchers to help pay article processing charges (APCs), enabling authors to comply with UKRI (RCUK)* open access policy.

The UKRI (RCUK)* stipulates that journals must meet the following criteria for publication:

  • A peer-review process
  • Gold open access - this allows immediate, unrestricted on-line access to peer-reviewed and published research papers, free of any access charge and with maximum opportunities for re-use
  • Publish under Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence and allow immediate deposit in other repositories

IJPDS is fully compliant with UKRI (RCUK)'s funding criteria as listed on SHERPA/RoMEO and in our author guidelines.

Follow this link to check whether your organisation is in receipt of UKRI (RCUK) open access block funding 2019.

(*UKRI (RCUK) includes AHRC, EPSRC, ESRC, MRC, NERC, NC3Rs and STFC)



At IJPDS we value research that truly impacts society. We are uniquely committed to connecting academia with the public and keeping them informed of exciting new research as it unfolds.

Working to bridge the gap between academic research and the public

The IJPDS' innovative model brings a new dimension to the traditional academic journal format by informing the public of the latest research and providing authors opportunities for direct impact and even greater visibility.

Engage directly with the public for maximum impact via The Conversation

In the field of Population Data Science, arguably the most important audience for your work are the ultimate beneficiaries, the public. This is where IJPDS authors can create the greatest impact of all.

To help authors disseminate the complex content of manuscripts published in IJPDS to this audience, we offer a service through The Conversation, which is an influential and independent channel for research news and views. Articles selected from the academic and research community for publishing in The Conversation are delivered directly to the public in an easy to understand general reader format, prepared by the authors from their original published manuscript.

The Conversation is truly international with Editors based in the UK, Australia, US, Africa and France, that are working with more than 55,000 specialist scholars and researchers. It is a not-for-profit, open access educational entity that provides a free on-line resource to help provide the public with clarity and insight into society's biggest problems.

Watch this video to find out how Emily Marchant, PhD Researcher from Swansea University, benefited from writing for The Conversation, or follow this link to find out more about The Conversation and to see previously published articles.

Why impact matters

The importance of impact beyond the world of academia cannot be underestimated. The ability to demonstrate the contribution of your research to and its influence on society

  1. is essential to securing future funding in an increasingly competitive market
  2. aids career progression through e.g. REF, University KPIs, PDRs and other HEIs
  3. helps develop your profile as a researcher specialising in a particular area
  4. aids networking and future collaboration
  5. has the potential to influence public policy

The Conversation can help IJPDS authors to achieve essential impact. Articles are disseminated to more than 22,000 sites worldwide, giving a global reach of 35 million readers a month, and The Conversation is a primary resource for up-to-the-minute content for the press, web, radio and TV.

Put simply, The Conversation unlocks the knowledge of researchers and academics allowing for better understanding of complex issues and a better quality of public discourse and conversations.

How to write for The Conversation

We encourage every author that publishes a manuscript in IJPDS to take full advantage of the service offered through The Conversation. As soon as your manuscript is published, we will contact you by email offering you the possibility of writing an article for The Conversation.

For authors wanting to take advantage of this service, we will forward your published manuscript* to IJPDS' designated Editor at The Conversation who will review the suitability of the content. Successful applicants will then be introduced directly to the Editor who will work closely with them to create the finished article.


*This service is available for manuscripts that undergo a full peer-review process with IJPDS



As an e-journal, IJPDS has the flexibility to publish approved manuscripts immediately without having to wait for each Issue.

As soon as a manuscript is ready, we ensure that your work is instantly available to the right audience via Open Access giving authors the greatest possibility of citations.



IJPDS benefits from an established specialist global audience spanning six continents within the field of population data science through its strategic partner, the International Population Data Linkage Network (IPDLN). We publish articles from around the world in order to highlight how the field of population data science is impacting societies globally.

IJPDS publishes research of interest to a number of sectors including:

  • Academia and research institutes
  • Governments
  • Healthcare and hospitals
  • Third sector organisations
  • Private sector organisations (e.g. Information Technology, Manufacturing, Consultancies)
  • Life Sciences

Our established readership spans a broad spectrum of specialist areas within population data science. Here is an example of the types of experts included in the Journal's readership:

  • Government officials
  • The public
  • Regulators
  • Academics (scholars, researchers, students)
  • Information governance professionals
  • Data Scientists
  • Statisticians
  • Epidemiologists and public health workers
  • Social scientists
  • Technologists (computer and information sciences)
  • Public Engagement professionals
  • Media

The IJPDS has a particular interest in engaging with the public, the ultimate beneficiaries of population data science research, which sets us apart from other scientific journals.

We value research within the field of population data science that truly impacts society and are uniquely committed to connecting academia with the public to keep them informed of exciting new research as it unfolds.



At IJPDS we appreciate that good quality research is presented in different formats.

The Journal distinguishes itself by accepting a broad range of submission formats that may be out of scope for other academic journals. These include:

  • Research articles
  • Review articles
  • Protocol papers
  • Methodological developments
  • Applied papers
  • Case studies
  • Features on a particular topic
  • Commentaries
  • Comments and letters
  • Reports of events
  • Working papers
  • General reader summaries of complex topics
  • Help-sheets and tips
  • Informative reports
  • Consultations


Whilst we are committed to keeping our APCs competitively priced for our authors, we must ensure the sustainability of IJPDS by covering all costs associated with the open access publishing process, from initial submission through to final publication and promotional activities.

Therefore, we will only ever charge what is necessary for the welfare of the journal and the satisfaction of its contributing authors.

Follow this link for details of the IJPDS Article Processing Charges



Sharing the data that accompanies your published research is a positive growing trend for the research community. Whilst we recognise that it is not always possible to share all data openly for ethical or confidentiality reasons, IJPDS encourages the sharing of non-sensitive raw data along with details of the software used wherever possible.


Why Share Research Data?

Benefits to the research community – Datasets are valuable to the research community and re-use of data avoids duplication of effort and the associated costs. This, in turn, can stimulate further research.

Benefits to the public – Stimulating further research through data sharing wherever possible is in the public’s interest as it can help accelerate the pace of research and its subsequent impact.

Satisfying Funders – Research funders are increasingly stipulating the sharing of data as a requirement. For example, in the UK, the ESRC stipulates that grant holders must formally deposit all data in a responsible data repository.

Increase research impact – Publishing your data is not only a good way of demonstrating that you were the first to conduct the research, but if your data is re-used, then you will benefit from citations in addition to the accompanying article.

Scientific Integrity – Sharing data allows others to replicate, validate, and correct your results thereby adding to the integrity of the science.

For details on how and where to submit your data, please refer to the Author Guidelines.

Latest Articles

Published online: 20 November, 2019

IJPDS Special issue: Data Centre Profiles


Special Issue Call for Manuscripts: 'Population Data Centre Profiles'

December 10, 2018

IJPDS would like to present a call for research articles for a special issue on ‘Population Data Centre Profiles’. Our overriding aim is to foster new opportunities for international collaborations in Population Data Science. Having a published profile of the data centre is an excellent way to document the work, raise awareness, share expertise and act as the seminal paper for future reference. 


IJPDS is now accepting new submissions and publishes on a continual basis. To submit a manuscript, you will be asked to register. IJPDS accepts a wide variety of manuscript types. Please refer to the author guidelines for the full list.


Make a Submission
issue cover




Identifying Military Veterans in a Clinical Research Database using Natural Language Processing

Daniel Leightley, Katharine M Mark, David Pernet, Dominic Murphy, Nicola T Fear, Sharon AM Stevelink
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET); more than a youth policy issue

Francis Mitrou, Michele Haynes, Francisco Perales, Stephen R Zubrick, Janeen Baxter
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Disclosive Data: Who uses it, why, and what difference does it make?

Andrew Engeli, Aidan Tolland
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Estimates of age-specific death rates and mortality risk using administrative pharmaceutical data

Shaun Purkiss, Tessa Keegel, Hassan Vally, Dennis Wollersheim
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Estimates of mortality rates in people with diabetes and cardiovascular disease using administrative pharmaceutical data

Shaun Purkiss, Tessa Keegel, Hassan Vally, Dennis Wollersheim
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors use in pregnancy: a risk assessment study using administrative pharmaceutical data

Shaun Purkiss, Tessa Keegel, Hassan Vally, Dennis Wollersheim
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Incidence of drug-treated chronic diseases using administrative pharmaceutical data

Shaun Purkiss, Tessa Keegel, Hassan Vally, Dennis Wollersheim
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

The New Brunswick COPD Health Information Platform

Ted McDonald
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Association between levodopa and ischemic heart disease

Khalid Orayj, Arron Lacey, Ashley Akbari, Mathew Smith, Owen Pickrell, Emma Lane
Published online: Nov 7, 2019

Linked government administrative data: Public or Private?

Joel Stafford
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Generation Scotland - Using Electronic Health Records for Research

Archie Campbell, Rachel Edwards, David Porteous
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

LINKAGE: Factors in selecting a data linkage approach

Kerina Jones, David Ford
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

iCoverT: A rich data source on the incidence of child maltreatment over time in England and Wales

Michelle Degli Esposti, David K Humphreys, Lucy Bowes
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Association between receipt of social care and multimorbidity: evidence from a population-sized cohort in Scotland

David Henderson, Iain Atherton, Nick Bailey, Colin McCowan, Stewart Mercer
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Childhood cognitive ability and the use of long-term care in later life

Matthew Iveson, Drew Altschul, Ian Deary
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Early-life cognitive ability and recovery from stroke

Drew Altschul, Matthew Iveson, Ian Deary
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The Emerging Crisis of Aged Homelessness in the US: Could Cost Avoidance in Health Care Fund Housing Solutions?

Dennis Culhane, Kelly Doran, Maryann Schretzman, Eileen Johns, Daniela Treglia, Thomas Byrne, Stephen Metraux, Randall Kuhn
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

What happens after self-harm? An exploration of self-harm and suicide using the Northern Ireland Registry of Self-Harm

Aideen Maguire, Emma Ross, Foteini Tseliou, Denise O'Hagan, Dermot O'Reilly
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Suicide following presentation to emergency departments with suicidal ideation: a population-wide study

Emma Ross, Aideen Maguire, Denise O'Hagan, Dermot O'Reilly
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Enough with the tables, we need ideas.

Antony Stevens
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Health conditions, disability and economic inactivity in Northern Ireland. An administrative data study.

Ana Corina Miller, Dermot O’Reilly, David Wright, Foteini Tseliou, Michael Rosato, Aideen Mcguire
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Data resource description: National Cancer Registration Dataset in England

Katherine Henson, Lucy Elliss-Brookes, Victoria Coupland, Elsita Payne, Sally Vernon, Brian Rous, Jem Rashbass
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Linkage of Primary Care Prescribing Records and Pharmacy Dispensing Records in Asthma Controller Medications

Holly Tibble, Aziz Sheikh, Athanasios Tsanas, Robert Horne, Mehrdad Mizani, Colin Simpson, James Lay-Flurrie
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Exploiting Administrative Data to Understand the Mental Health of Children Known to Social Services

Sarah McKenna, Aideen Maguire, Dermot O'Reilly
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Data resource description: Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy (SACT) Dataset

Chloe Bright, Sarah Lawton, Stephen Benson, Martine Bomb, David Dodwell, Katherine Henson, Sean McPhail, Louise Miller, Jem Rashbass, Alice Turnball, Rebecca Smittenaar
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Poor mental health and uptake of disability benefits

Dermot O’Reilly, Michael Rosato, David Wright, Foteini Tseliou, Ana Corina Miller, Aideen Maguire
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Depression and changes in educational attainment using administrative data: The role of socio-demographic characteristics

Alice Wickersham, Hannah Dickson, Robert Stewart, Tamsin Ford, Johnny Downs
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Increasing the understanding of patterns of behaviours for alcohol in Wales using R

Rhian Hughes, Bethan Patterson, Clare Withey
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Area Deprivation, Urbanicity and Severe Mental Illness – A Population-Based Linkage Study Using Routinely Collected Primary and Secondary Care Data

Sze Chim Lee, Marcos Delpozo-Banos, Keith Lloyd, Ian Jones, James TR Walters, Michael J Owen, Michael O‘Donovan, Ann John
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Automatic coding of occupation and cause-of-death records

Richard Tobin, Elaine Farrow, Claire Grover, Beatrice Alex
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Does the risk of poor mental health rise before widowhood?

Zhiqiang Feng, Chris Dibben, Dawn Everington, Lee Williamson, Gillian Raab
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Long-term outcomes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in childhood: The LUCI study

Kathryn Hughes, Rebecca Cannings-John, Hywel Jones, Fiona Lugg-Widger, Mandy Lau, Shantini Paranjothy, Nick Francis, Alastair Hay, Christopher Butler, Judith Van der Voort, Kerenza Hood
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study

Alison Sizer, Oliver Duke-Williams
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Data linkage for public health research – the Fforestfach tyre fire

Leon May, Lloyd Evans
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Building a research partnership between computer scientists and health service researchers for access and analysis of population-level health datasets: what are we learning?

Michael Schull, Michael Brudno, Marzyeh Ghassemi, Garth Gibson, Anna Goldenbrg, Alison Paprica, Laura Rosella, Therese Stukel, Charles Victor, Carl Virtanen
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Careers guidance provisions and progression to post-16 education: An empirical analysis for Wales

Rhys Davies, Suhaer Yunus, Katy Huxley
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Careers Guidance and Transitions to Further Education in Wales

Katy Huxley, Rhys Davies, Suhaer Yunus
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The Hazards and Rewards of Screening Using a Population Register: The Case of HAGIS

David Bell, Elaine Douglas
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The Secure Anonymised Information Linkage databank Dementia e-cohort (SAIL-DeC)

Christian Schnier, Tim Wilkinson, Chris Orton, Laura North, Ryan Rochford, Cathie Sudlow
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The association between mother’s alcohol consumption during pregnancy and their child’s educational attainment and risk of hospital admission by age 14

Amrita Bandyopadhyay, Sinead Brophy, Simon Moore, Ashley Akbari, Shantini Paranjothy, Ronan Lyons
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Do carers care for themselves? A population-based study

Foteini Tseliou, Mark Atkinson, Shantini Paranjothy, Pauline Ashfield-Watt
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Examining the link between family health events and pupil performance in Wales

Phil Murphy, Samuel Brown
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The Welsh Government Flying Start Data Linking Project

Laura Herbert, Tony Whiffen, Sarah Lowe, Craiger Solomons
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

Co-design of data collection with participants of the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s cohort study

Marjorie Johnston, Jessica Butler, Heather Clark, Louise Locock, Alison Murray, Lynn Robertson, Dorota Chapko, Phil Hannaford, Lisa Iversen, Zoe Skea, Corri Black
Published online: Nov 8, 2019

The use of Administrative Data to combat non-response

Matthew Moore, Alasdair Rutherford, Elaine Douglas, David Bell
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Thriving, catching up or falling behind: Immigrant and refugee children’s kindergarten competencies and later academic achievement

Monique Gagné, Martin Guhn, Scott Emerson, Carly Magee, Constance Milbrath, Anne Gadermann
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Does physical ill-health increase the risk of suicide? A Census-based follow-up study of over 1 million people

Ifeoma Onyeka, Emma Ross, Aideen Maguire, Dermot O’Reilly
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Hidden Harms of Hypnotics: a population based record linkage study of psychotropic medication and suicide risk

Ifeoma Onyeka, Aideen Maguire, Dermot O’Reilly
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

The Impact of School Exclusion on Educational Achievement: Evidence from English Administrative Data

Mark McGovern, Duncan McVicar, Dermot O’Reilly, Neil Rowland
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Mortality of Canadian military personnel over 40 years

Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, Murray Weeks, Kristen Simkus, Linda Vantil
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Ambient Air Pollution and Health in Northern Ireland

Neil Rowland, Mark McGovern, Duncan McVicar, Dermot O'Reilly
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

InFORM: Improving care for people who Frequently call 999: co-production of guidance through an Observational study using Routine linked data and Mixed methods

Ashrafunessa Khanom, Adrian Edwards, Bethan Edwards, Heather Hughes, Ann John, Robin Petterson, Ceri Phillips, Alison Porter, Nigel Rees, Jason Scott, Alan Watkins, Helen Snooks
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Exploratory Research on the Health and Social Outcomes of Public Housing

Mark Smith, Aynslie Hinds, Heather Prior, Dan Chateau
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

National Therapeutic Indicators in Scotland and Financial Incentives

Sean MacBride-Stewart, Bruce Guthrie, Charis Marwick, Simon Hurding
Published online: Nov 18, 2019

Using data linkage innovation and collaboration to create a cross-sectoral data repository for Western Australia

Anna Ferrante, James Boyd, Tom Eitelhuber, Sean Randall, Adrian Brown, Max Maller, Davie Botes, Kurt Sibma
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Linking Pathology Datasets – Trials and Triumphs

Brian Stokes, Matthew Jose, Nadine Wiggins, Tim Albion
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Spatially Enabling The Master Linkage Map – Getting Straight To The Point

Brian Stokes, Tim Albion, Nadine Wiggins
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Measuring and explaining the changing nature of work - The Linked Personnel Panel enriched with administrative employment data (LPP-ADIAB)

Philipp Grunau, Tobias Haepp, Jan Mackeben, Kevin Ruf, Stefanie Wolter
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

The Office for National Statistics Administrative Data Methods Research Programme

Claire Shenton, Lucy Tinklet, Hannah Finselbach
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Common Mental Disorder across Standard Occupational Classifications in Northern Ireland: an administrative data study

Finola Ferry, Michael Roasto, Emma Curran, Gerard Leavey
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Protecting children during child protection research using administrative data

Jade Hooper, Linda Cusworth, Helen Whincup
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Household Matching for the 2021 Census

Josie Plachta, Charlie Tomlin
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

What happens without population data? – The case of Ukraine

Dorottya Molnár-Kovács
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Pros and cons of using anonymised linked routine data to improve efficiency of randomised controlled trials in healthcare: experience in primary and emergency care

Helen Snooks, Alan Watkins, Matthew Jones, Ashrafunessa Khanom, Jenna Jones, Ronan A Lyons
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Defining Acute Kidney Injury Episodes

Gareth Davies, Timothy Scale, Ashley Akbari, James Chess, Ronan A Lyons
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Social services Interventions and the Mental Health and Mortality of care leavers: a population based data linkage study in Northern Ireland and Finland

Aideen Maguire, Anne Kouvonen, Dermot O'Reilly, Hanna Remes, Joonas Pitkänen, Pekka Martikainen
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Educational outcomes of children in Wales with cerebral palsy

Hywel Jones, Bethan Carter, Jackie Bethel, Verity Bennett, Sarah Rees, Ting Wang, Huw Collins, Alison Kemp
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

The safety of Waterbirth in the UK: a feasibility study of routine data linkage – The POOL Study

Fiona Lugg-Widger, Christian Barlow, Rebecca Cannings-John, Chris Gale, Rebecca Milton, Mike Robling, Julia Sanders
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Developing and evaluating national severity distributions for use in Burden of Disease studies: a case study of cancers in Scotland

Grant Wyper, Ian Grant, Eilidh Fletcher, Gerry McCartney, Diane Stockton
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Scottish Burden of Disease (SBOD) study: developments and findings of local estimates

Grant Wyper, Ian Grant, Eilidh Fletcher, Gerry McCartney, Diane Stockton
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Protocol for evaluating the impact of interventions on the future Burden of Disease in Scotland

Grant Wyper, Ian Grant, Eilidh Fletcher, Neil Anand, Neil Craig, Gerry McCartney, Diane Stockton
Published online: Nov 19, 2019

Fuel Poverty Data Linking Project

Craiger Solomons, Sarah Lowe, Josh Dixon, Tony Whiffen, Rachel Bowen, Matthew Davies, Hugo Vine
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Using record linkage to test representativeness of an ageing cohort

Frances Burns, Mische McKelvie, Sharon Cruise, Dermot O'Reilly
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Research Ready Data Lakes: Protecting Privacy in Relatable Datasets

Robert McMillan, Maggie Reeves
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Repeatable Research Infrastructure Enabling Administrative Data Analysis

Daniel Thayer, Muhammad Elmessary, Daniel Mallory, Pete Arnold, Michal Cichowski, Caroline Brooks, Sarah Rees, Ting Wang, Huw Collins, David Ford
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

One-year readmission and Emergency department presentation after an epilepsy admission in people with intellectual disability: a registry-linkage study

Peiwen Liao, Simone Reppermund, Claire Vajdic, Julian N Trollor, Preeyaporn Srasuebkul
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Overcoming the misrepresentation of disease burden associated with single aggregation choropleth maps through combining information from many aggregations

Matthew Tuson, Matthew Yap, Mei Ruu Kok, Bryan Boruff, Kevin Murray, Alistair Vickery, Berwin Turlach, David Whyatt
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Development of an Injury Indicator Tool to Support Policy and Practice across Wales.

Samantha L Turner, Jane Lyons, Ronan A Lyons
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

How complete, representative and accurate is recording of child BMI in electronic general practice records? A record linkage study

Nicola Firman, John Robson, Zaheer Ahmed, Kambiz Boomla, Carol Dezateux
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Prevalence three ways: Comparison of linked data from a patient register and electronic health records with allowance for linkage error

James Doidge, Joan Morris, Katie Harron, Sarah Stevens, Ruth Gilbert
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Improving Data Linkage in Government Statistics: The National Statistician’s Quality Review 2019

Louise Palmer, Charlie Wroth-Smith, Anthony Edwards
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Measuring the Dynamic Risk of Further Offending: A Feasibility Study

Helen Hodges, Kevin Fahey
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Epilepsy Mortality in Wales: 2005-2017

Helen Daniels, Arron Lacey, Ashley Akbari, Rob Powell, Owen Pickrell
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Social media engagement and health

Alisha Davies, Jiao Song, Catherine Sharp
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

The Nuffield Family Justice Observatory Data Partnership

Lucy Griffiths, Rhodri Johnson, Linda Cusworth, Ashley Akbari, Bachar Alrouh, Stuart Bedston, Judith Harwin, Kerina Jones, Jonathan Smart, Simon Thompson, David Ford, Karen Broadhurst
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

A tale of multiple data sources: pathways and outcomes for infants who become looked after in Scotland

Linda Cusworth, Nina Biehal, Helen Whincup
Published online: Nov 21, 2019

Homelessness and health needs in Wales

Jiao Song, Charlotte Grey, Louise Woodfine, Alisha Davies
Published online: Nov 27, 2019

Using linked English cancer registration data to assess variation in diagnostic pathway length

Jess Fraser, Clare Pearson, Jon Shelton, Jodie Moffat
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Born into Care: characterising newborn babies and infants in care proceedings in England and Wales

Bachar Alrouh, Karen Broadhurst, Lucy Griffiths, Rhodri Johnson, Linda Cusworth, Stuart Bedston, Ashley Akbari, Kerina Jones, David Ford
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Quantifying multi-morbidity in an ethnically-diverse inner city population: the health burden of households

Gill Harper, Jane Lyons, Richard Fry, Ashley Akbari, Zaheer Ahmed, Ronan Lyons, Carol Dezateux, John Robson
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

GRAPHITE: Geographic Information UK Secure E-Research Platform

Richard Fry, Amy Mizen, Ashley Akbari, Simon Thompson
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Self-harm presentation across healthcare settings by sex in young people

Amanda Marchant, Samantha Turner, Lloyd Balbuena, Evyn Peters, Dave Williams, Keith Lloyd, Ronan Lyons, Ann John
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Evaluating ATC-ICD: Assessing the relationship between selected medication and diseases with machine learning

Nadine Weibrecht, Florian Endel, Melanie Zechmeister
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

The impacts of pre-apprenticeship training for young people

Richard Dorsett, Lucy Stokes
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Admin vs. questionnaire data: Can we replace ‘highest qualification’ questions with admin data?

Stephan Tietz, Nicola Haines, Brogan Taylor
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Co-producing a typology for Green and Blue spaces for a longitudinal, national dataset of Green and Blue spaces

Amy Mizen, Richard Fry, Ben Wheeler, Sarah Rodgers
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Donor-based imputation methods for admin data: How to replace the number of rooms question on the Census

Stephan Tietz, Andy Mealor, Fern Leather, Ali Dent
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Understanding recurrent care proceedings: Competing risks of how mothers and fathers enter subsequent care proceedings in England

Stuart Bedston, Yang Hu, Georgia Philip, Lindsay Youansamouth, Marian Brandon, Karen Broadhurst, John Clifton
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Developing a new cohort of children born to women who used opioids in pregnancy using administrative data: insights into cohort creation and early results

Louise Marryat, Rachael Wood, Anne Whittaker, John Frank, James Boardman
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Risk factors for young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) using the Scottish Longitudinal Study

Dawn Everington, Zhiqiang Feng, Kevin Ralston, Chris Dibben
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Regulating Statistics in the Age of Data Abundance

Catherine Bromley
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

Healthcare resource utilisation for critical care survivors in Wales: a population-based data linkage study

Rowena Bailey, Tamas Szakmany, Richard Pugh, Ashley Akbari, Ronan Lyons
Published online: Nov 22, 2019

U.S. Decennial Census Digitization and Linkage Project

Trent Alexander, Katie Genadek
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

People with cancer living in deprived areas of Wales are more likely to have another serious condition at diagnosis than those in the least deprived areas

Dyfed Huws, Rebecca Thomas, Julie Howe, Adele Oddy, Tomos Smith, David Egan, Tamsin Long, Kelly Shiell-Davis
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Administrative Data Censuses in US States

Amy O'Hara
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

The Differential Privacy Corner: What has the US Backed Itself Into?

Amy O'Hara, Quentin Brummet
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Leveraging Electronic Health Records and Administrative Datasets to Understand Social Determinants of Health: Opportunities and Challenges

Jonathan Tan, Jack Wasey, Olivia Nelson, Vicky Tam, Allan Simpao, Jorge Galvez
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

An outline framework for the efficient onward-sharing of linked Longitudinal Population Study and NHS Digital records.

Andy Boyd, Garry Coleman, Estelle Spence, Alison Park, Rebecca Hardy
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

High-dimensional propensity score adjustment in HIV research using linked administrative health data

Taylor McLinden, Rolando Barrios, Robert Hogg
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Education and health outcomes of children treated for chronic conditions

Michael Fleming, Catherine A Fitton, Markus FC Steiner, James S McLay, David Clark, Albert King, Daniel F MacKay, Jill P Pell
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Strengthening the use of administrative data to provide gender statistics

Lauren Pandolfelli, Karen Carter
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Harnessing administrative data for humanitarian responses

Karen Carter, Kate Alley, Hye Jung Han
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Piloting a Safe Health Researcher course

Louise Corti, Deborah Wiltshire
Published online: Nov 25, 2019

Data intensive science and the public good: Results of public deliberations in British Columbia, Canada

Kimberlyn McGrail, Michael Burgess, Kieran O'Doherty, Colene Bentley, Jack Teng
Published online: Nov 26, 2019

Gender and STEM Subject Choice

Anne Gasteen
Published online: Nov 26, 2019

Maternal adversity and variation in the rate of children entering local authority care during infancy in England: a longitudinal ecological study

Rachel Pearson, Matthew Jay, Linda Wijlaars, Bianca De Stavola, Stuart Bedston, Ruth Gilbert
Published online: Nov 26, 2019

Exploratory versus experimental design: overcoming the prejudice of ‘data dredging’.

Polly Pascoe, Sarah Jane Jones
Published online: Nov 26, 2019

Developing data governance standards for using free-text data in research (TexGov)

Kerina Jones, Elizabeth Ford, Nathan Lea, Lucy Griffiths, Sharon Heys, Emma Squires
Published online: Nov 26, 2019

Evaluation of the Troubled Families Programme

Lan-Ho Man
Published online: Nov 26, 2019



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