Data resource description: Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy (SACT) Dataset

Main Article Content

Chloe Bright
Sarah Lawton
Stephen Benson
Martine Bomb
David Dodwell
Katherine Henson
Sean McPhail
Louise Miller
Jem Rashbass
Alice Turnball
Rebecca Smittenaar
Published online: Nov 8, 2019


Background
The Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy (SACT) dataset is a unique source of national, real-world data reporting chemotherapy activity delivered by NHS treatment providers in England. SACT data are collected with the intent of improving disease-free or progression-free survival.


MainĀ Aim
The SACT dataset aims to provide a detailed resource on systemic treatments delivered in secondary and tertiary settings in England for patients with cancer.


Approach
The SACT dataset is collected and curated by the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) at Public Health England. The dataset was launched in a phased implementation from April 2012. From April 2014 submission of SACT data became mandatory for all NHS treatment providers. Data are collected on the patient, tumour, regimen, treatment cycle, drug details, and treatment outcomes. The SACT dataset can be linked to other data held by NCRAS, for example the cancer registry1, Hospital Episodes Statistics2, and the national Radiotherapy Dataset to provide a complete picture of the cancer patient pathway.


Results
The SACT dataset is being used: for the appraisal of drugs funded through the Cancer Drugs Fund; to review the quality of cancer care as part of the National Cancer Audits; and for observational research purposes, including investigating 30-day mortality following chemotherapy3, and sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer4. The data are also released to external researchers via the Office for Data Release.


Conclusion
The SACT dataset is a unique resource in terms of the breadth and depth of information on chemotherapy prescribed to cancer patients. The key strengths are: the national coverage; real-world data; detailed clinical information beyond cancer registration data; and the ability to link to other cancer datasets.


References


  1. Henson KE, Elliss-Brookes L, Coupland VH, Payne E, Vernon S, Rous B et al. Data Resource Profile: National Cancer Registration Dataset in England. Int J Epidemiol 2019; doi 10.1093/ije/dyz076.

  2. Herbert A, Wijlaars L, Zylbersztejn A, Cromwell D, Hardelid P. Data Resource Profile: Hospital Episode Statistics Admitted Patient Care (HES APC). Int J Epidemiol 2017; 46(4): 1093-1093i; e-pub ahead of print 2017/03/25; doi 10.1093/ije/dyx015.

  3. Wallington M, Saxon EB, Bomb M, Smittenaar R, Wickenden M, McPhail S et al. 30-day mortality after systemic anticancer treatment for breast and lung cancer in England: a population-based, observational study. The Lancet Oncology 2016; 17(9): 1203-1216; doi 10.1016/s1470-2045(16)30383-7.

  4. Henson KE, Fry A, Lyratzopoulos G, Peake M, Roberts KJ, McPhail S. Sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer: evidence from population-based data in England during 2013-2014. Br J Cancer 2018; doi 10.1038/s41416-018-0028-7.


Background

The Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy (SACT) dataset is a unique source of national, real-world data reporting chemotherapy activity delivered by NHS treatment providers in England. SACT data are collected with the intent of improving disease-free or progression-free survival.

Main aim

The SACT dataset aims to provide a detailed resource on systemic treatments delivered in secondary and tertiary settings in England for patients with cancer.

Approach

The SACT dataset is collected and curated by the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) at Public Health England. The dataset was launched in a phased implementation from April 2012. From April 2014 submission of SACT data became mandatory for all NHS treatment providers. Data are collected on the patient, tumour, regimen, treatment cycle, drug details, and treatment outcomes. The SACT dataset can be linked to other data held by NCRAS, for example the cancer registry [1], Hospital Episodes Statistics [2], and the national Radiotherapy Dataset to provide a complete picture of the cancer patient pathway.

Results

The SACT dataset is being used: for the appraisal of drugs funded through the Cancer Drugs Fund; to review the quality of cancer care as part of the National Cancer Audits; and for observational research purposes, including investigating 30-day mortality following chemotherapy [3], and sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer [4]. The data are also released to external researchers via the Office for Data Release.

Conclusion

The SACT dataset is a unique resource in terms of the breadth and depth of information on chemotherapy prescribed to cancer patients. The key strengths are: the national coverage; real-world data; detailed clinical information beyond cancer registration data; and the ability to link to other cancer datasets.

References

  1. Henson KE, Elliss-Brookes L, Coupland VH, Payne E, Vernon S, Rous B et al. Data Resource Profile: National Cancer Registration Dataset in England. Int J Epidemiol 2019; 10.1093/ije/dyz076 https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz076

  2. Herbert A, Wijlaars L, Zylbersztejn A, Cromwell D, Hardelid P. Data Resource Profile: Hospital Episode Statistics Admitted Patient Care (HES APC). Int J Epidemiol 2017; 46(4): 1093-1093i; e-pub ahead of print 2017/03/25; 10.1093/ije/dyx015 https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyx015

  3. Wallington M, Saxon EB, Bomb M, Smittenaar R, Wickenden M, McPhail S et al. 30-day mortality after systemic anticancer treatment for breast and lung cancer in England: a population-based, observational study. The Lancet Oncology 2016; 17(9): 1203-1216; 10.1016/s1470-2045(16)30383-7 https://doi.org/10.1016/s1470-2045(16)30383-7

  4. Henson KE, Fry A, Lyratzopoulos G, Peake M, Roberts KJ, McPhail S. Sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer: evidence from population-based data in England during 2013-2014. Br J Cancer 2018; 10.1038/s41416-018-0028-7 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-018-0028-7

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